cavWhile fiber optic cables have been around for long, few people know about it. Here are 6 things that you should know about them:

They have a solid history

Although, many people started hearing of these cables in the 1990’s they have been there since 1870’s. Just like any other technology, the cables have been growing and improving everyday and they will continue being made better.

They are green

To protect the environment, companies have been coming up with harmless products. Fiber optic cables are one of the harmless products that consume just minimal amounts of light to transfer data from one place to another. Due to the low energy required, low levels of carbon dioxide are released thus the environment is protected. The low energy also means that the cost of running the cables is low which saves money to network owners. The users also have a great experience.

The cable uses light

Most of the data cables known to mankind use power to transfer data, but this isn’t the case with fiber optics. The units use light thus there is no heat involved. Absence of heat means that the cable isn’t a fire hazard; therefore, you don’t have to shy away from installing it in your home or office.

They transfer data fast

Due to their increased capacity, the units have been shown to transmit data much faster compared to their traditional counterparts. Currently, the units have the ability of transmitting up to 16 terabits of data in one second over a 7,000km distance. The fast nature of the units and their high capacities translates to fewer connections and great experience to both the network owner and consumer.

They have a wide range of applications

If you ask many people, they will tell you that fiber optic cables are only used in transferring computer data. While the units are heavily used in this application, they are also used in other areas such as: art, signs, imaging optics, spectroscopy, gun sights and artificial Christmas trees.

They are weather resistant

Since the units use light instead of electricity like the traditional units, they aren’t affected by changes in rain, temperature, cold and other weather conditions.

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